US sets aside 11GHz of high-frequency spectrum for 5G wireless technology

US sets aside 11GHz of high-frequency spectrum for 5G wireless technology

In a move which makes the US the first country in the world to set aside plentiful airwaves for the next-generation 5G wireless applications and networks, the FCC has, in a unanimous vote, opened up 11 gigahertz (GHz) of high-frequency spectrum for mobile, flexible and fixed-use wireless broadband.

The 11 GHz high-frequency 5G spectrum which the FCC has decided to set aside includes 7 GHz of unlicensed spectrum and 3.85 GHz of licensed spectrum.

About the move to set aside high-frequency 5G spectrum, the FCC said that bigwig US wireless carriers like Verizon and AT&T are already inching towards the adoption of 5G, the fifth generation of wireless technology.

The FCC also said that the new high-speed 5G networks will have the capability to offer at least 10 times faster – and probably even 100 times faster – Internet speeds as compared to the currently-in-use 4G networks.

Asserting that the FCC’s decision to keep aside 11GHz of high-frequency spectrum for 5G marks “a big day for our nation," FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said that the move makes "the United States the first country in the world to identify and open up vast amounts of high-frequency spectrum for 5G applications.” Wheeler further added that the US is “using much higher-frequency bands than previously thought viable for flexible uses, including mobile.”

Health