Testing for activity of two genes could identify women facing increased death risk due to breast cancer:Study

Testing for activity of two genes could identify women facing increased death risk due to breast cancer:Study

A latest study performed on nearly 2000 patients suggested that testing for the activity of two genes may point out women facing elevated risk of losing life to their breast cancers.

Women with tumors having a particular activity pattern in both the genes were three times as probably of dying as others with a distinct pattern of activity.

London’s Institute of Cancer Research’s scientists have found the pattern of gene activity in breast cancer cells with a specific capability to flee from the glue that usually holds them together.

According to them, the genes may play a significant role in freeing cells from this glue, called the extracellular matrix, so that they can spread in thebody.

The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and Breast Cancer Now funded research that may be used in the development of tests for aggressive breast cancers, or even for identifying fresh targets for cancer treatment.

Published in the journal Oncotarget on Wednesday,the study examined breast cancer cells positive for HER2 protein, the drug Herceptin’s target, which exists in nearly 20% tumors.

The ICR researchers have come up with a latest image-based screening technique for the detection of cancer cells that didn't glue to the protein laminin, which plays a part in building scaffolding around cells to stick them together.

The researchers noted that the cells were more active in a gene known as F12 and less active in another known as STC2.

When they studied the same genes in 1,964 breast cancers, they discovered that the pattern of activity was strongly associated with survival.

They observed that women with high F12 activity and low STC2 activity in tumors possessed 32% chance of losing life within a decade, whereas the ones with low F12 activity and high STC2 activity had just 10%probability of dying.

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