Parents with diabetic kids at home must consider this

Parents with diabetic kids at home must consider this

Brooke Yost of St. Louis, Missouri has entered into seventh grade, carrying her floral bag consisting testing strips, insulin, needles, a glucagon kit for low blood sugar. The 12-year old Brooke carries along her medical bag to every place she visits. She has been leading this life since kindergarten to deal with her Type 1 diabetes.

In a person suffering from Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin, an important hormone that maintains glucose levels, or blood sugar, inside the body. If not treated in time, the Type 1 diabetes can result into long-term problems for eyes, nerves, kidneys and other organs.

Sudden episodes of very low blood sugar or hypoglycemia are one of the more immediate concerns. There are many factors, including food, exercise, health problems, tension and stress that can have a bad impact on the delicate balance between multiple everyday insulin shots and irregular blood sugar levels.

Dealing with Type 1 diabetes is a very difficult challenge even for the most organized adults. For diabetes-affected children and their parents, entering into the new school year is itself a huge project. Here are the steps that can help children realize their complete school experience while leading a risk free life:

Make sure you have a medical plan. Child's health care providers make the diabetes medical management plan, including mentioned orders for glucose testing and insulin treatment, physical indications the staff at the child’s school must look for and the details of the person to whom they should consult if encounters a problem. Parents must share the plan with the teachers, school nurse and administrative office of their kid’s school. Everybody who comes across the affected-kid during the day must be aware that the kid has diabetes. They should be told in a way that they could recognize when the kid need help.

Dr. Henry Rodriguez, a professor of pediatrics at the University of South Florida and clinical director of the USF Diabetes Center, said, “That plan is important because it really should map out, if it's complete, all what ifs? Basically making sure what to do when a blood sugar is high, when it's low, how frequently to monitor and what the emergency contact information is”.

A report published in Eurek Alert revealed, "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. As a result, blood sugar builds in the bloodstream and cells cannot get the energy they need to function."

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, but only a fraction of them have Type 1 diabetes. Out of every 1,000 American adults, between one and five adults has Type 1 diabetes, according to the Endocrine Society's Endocrine Facts and Figures Report.

Thirty people who had Type 1 diabetes participated in the randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The phase IV study's participants were between the ages of 18 and 75, and they were already taking liraglutide and insulin to manage their diabetes. Twenty participants were randomly assigned to receive 10 milligrams of dapaglifozin daily for 12 weeks, and the other 10 received a placebo during that period.

According to a report in US NEWS by Lisa Esposito, "With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to make insulin, an essential hormone that keeps glucose levels, or blood sugar, steady within the body. Type 1 diabetes can cause long-term damage to the eyes, nerves, kidneys and other organs if left untreated."

Put your medical plan together. Developed with your child's health care providers, the diabetes medical management plan includes written orders for glucose testing and insulin treatment, physical signs that school staff should look for and whom to call if there's a problem.

"That plan is important because it really should map out, if it's complete, all the what ifs?" says Dr. Henry Rodriguez, a professor of pediatrics at the University of South Florida and clinical director of the USF Diabetes Center.

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