Latest assessment of status of UK’s 244 birds has ‘red-listed’ 27% as being of ‘highest conservation concern’

Latest assessment of status of UK’s 244 birds has ‘red-listed’ 27% as being of ‘highest conservation concern’

According to a latest report, more than a quarter of the birds in the UK, like species the curlew and puffin, are now battling for survival. The most recent assessment of the status of the 244 birds of the UK has ‘red-listed’ 27% birds as being of ‘highest conservation concern’, indicating that instant action is required to stop their extinction locally.

Severe declines have been seen in most of the 67 species as their numbers or range has fallen almost 50% in recent decades. Since the last assessment done in 2009, a rise of 15 species has been seen on the red list.

The curlew, which is easily identified by its long, curved beak and unique call, has faced a fast decline in its 42% population in the UK between 1995 and 2008. Previous month, a report called for the upland bird to become the highest conservation priority of the country due to the global significance of its UK population, which probably represents over 30% of the west European population.

The curlew is among 5 upland species that have been put on the red list along with the dotterel, whinchat, grey wagtail and merlin. The reports has warned this is indicative that many of the UK’s upland species have been facing increasing trouble, as the total number of upland birds on the red list have now reached 12. The upland bird populations have been increasingly getting pressurized by forestry, recreation, renewable energy generation, shooting and water storage.

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