CDC: Women Three Times More Likely to be Bisexual than Men

CDC: Women Three Times More Likely to be Bisexual than Men

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has come up with a new report which states that women are three times more likely to be bisexual than men. Officials conducted survey in which they interviewed about 9,000 adults between the ages of 18 and 44. Out of total people who took part in the survey, 5.5% of women and 2% of men have been identified as bisexual. When compared with the results of the similar survey conducted few years ago, there seems to have only 0.8% increases in bisexual males whereas 40% increase in the rate of bisexuality in females has been reported. When breaking down the overall statistic of female bisexuality, 7.8% of women between the ages of 18 and 24 identified as bisexual, compared to 5.4% of women between the ages of 25 and 34 and 4% of women between the ages of 25 and 34. The same gradual decline of bisexual identifiers as age increases is also present for men.

But both genders are showing a shift in general sexual attraction. When the 18 to 24-year-old segment was asked if they were attracted to only the opposite sex, 75.9 of women and 88.6% of men said yes. Ritch Savin-Williams, a professor of developmental psychology at Cornell University and author of several books on sexual orientation, said that there is a progression away from straightness and he does not consider this as a change in actual sexuality. “I always think of it as reflecting permission – that women now have greater permission to say they have some sexual attraction to other women”.

Debby Herbenick, associate professor at Indiana University, said that with increase in awareness of bisexuality among people, it becomes easier for them to identify and then label themselves as bisexual. Casey Copen, a demographer at the CDC National Center for Health Statistics and lead author of the study, said that women have consistently reported higher same-sex contact compared to men. The survey differentiated between sexual attraction, sexual behavior, and sexual orientation, allowing respondents to answer with their relative level of attraction for each gender.

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